A Beautiful End

First off, I thought the final episode of LOST was a beautiful and appropriate ending to this amazing series. Did it answer all of my questions? Absolutely not. Did it bring resolution to all the story lines? I don’t think so. Do I understand the significance of the number sequences, the names on the wall and Elose Hawking’s pendulum? Not so much. Was I upset about how they corrupted the beauty of the chapel with the hideous stained glass window that contained the symbols of every imaginable religious system under the sun? You bet. Did it have some lame moments (like Kate’s last words to UnLocke, “I saved my last bullet for you”)? Indeed. Nonetheless, in my mind Sunday’s finale was the most gripping and moving evening of television I have ever experienced and I embraced it as a beautiful end.

I have been pretty slow all along in grasping the complexity of the storyline and the layers of connections in LOST.  But last night as each character experienced his or her awakening in sideways world, a little light bulb went off inside of me and each one brought a sense of satisfaction and joy. Sun and Jin at the ultrasound; Charlie and Claire holding Aaron; Juliet and Sawyer at the vending machine; Kate touching Jack at the concert–connections made. What about Ben asking Locke for forgiveness and the words of Scripture that came to mind as Jack heroically gave his life for his friends (“no greater love than this than a man lay down his life for his friends”).

I like what James Poniewozik from Time magazine wrote:

The moving, soulful finale that Damon Lindelof and Carleton Cuse gave us met that challenge. The Island world, we learned, absolutely mattered to the physical fate of the survivors. (And sci-fi purists ticked over the spiritual ending should at least give it up for this: what happened, did, indeed happen.) And the Sideways world mattered because it was the culmination of the spiritual, moral, human lives–the souls–of the characters.”

And I was deeply touched by the power of community. It is interesting that this week in our Tangible Kingdom study we are exploring this idea of community. Community is a mysterious kind of thing and in many cases it seems to promise more than it actually delivers. But the episode reminded me to push into the power of community and it brought to mind the words of Gilbert Bilizekian who passionately insists that “only community remains.”

Recall this dialogue between Jack and his father:

Jack: Where are we?
Christian: This is a place you all made together so you could find one another…Nobody does it all alone. You needed them and they needed you.
Jack: For what?
Christian: To remember and to let go.

Thank you LOST. See you in another life, brotha.

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